Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Que Viva Mexico

I really enjoyed this movie. Specifically though, I was really intrigued by the deep connections the filmmakers make between the Mexico they film and nature and the past. The first part, in which they observe the ruins, and the people are integrated into the ruins really affected me. In doing this, they showed how the identity of true Mexico is kept intact even after the assimilation forced upon them by the Spaniards. The long shots of peoples faces as they mirror the statues of the temples spoke voliumes to me. This creates a kind of exaltation of Mexican identity we haven't seen before; it makes me think of the grandeur of the Aztecs and how it has not gone away. A part of the narration I could not forget is when the narrator says "It is a kingdom of death, where the past rules the future." This stabalizes a connection with the true base of Mexican Identity which hasn't been changed by the present state of Mexico.
I think this film is able to create a Mexico in an honest way. This is aided by the discourses the narrator presents. He tells of Concepcion and the bull fighter, both representing common Mexicans in a positive light who become representations of the country's people.
The connection to nature, as seen in the constant shots of animals frolicking and what not, and the people relaxing in nature without the aid of material goods shows a kind of value to Mexican identity. A connection to nature to me signifies a connection to virtue and exsistelntial truthfulness.
For these reasons, the constant images of nature and the past, this film is a far greater representation of Mexican identity than others we have seen. Though the film somewhat generalizes, it steers away from making stock characters and critiquing them. The film brings to light the values of Mexico rather than condemming it for the faults so many other representations dwell on .

4 comments:

  1. I feel the same way with you, probably because i'm easily attracted by those mysterious and weird movies. I guess the montage he used in the film leaves people a lot of space to imagine and to comprehend.

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  2. I agree too that the film makers tried to be as honest as possible with what they say in their travels.

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  3. It was nice to see that part of Mexico finally viwed in a more positive light. The previous films have focused on the hardships and dilemnas facing Mexico while this film showed more of a sense of feeling partiotic and proud.

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  4. I agree with what you said about people being integrated with the ruins. I really liked that part too.

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